Huffington Post Canada

The ongoing trend of corruption in student unions

Durham College and the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) are withholding student funds from the Student Association after it failed to provide audited financial statements for the 2012-2013 school year.

Universities have, on occasion, intervened and exercised their power to withhold money from student unions acting against the wishes of their membership. Student union executives typically respond with a sad attempt to take the moral high ground, repeating variations of the following: “student unions should have autonomy over their own affairs.”

The Durham and UOIT Student Association President, Peter Chinweuba, for instance, stated:

The decision is unfair as it infringes upon the autonomy of the Student Association.

The University of Guelph in 2012 stopped collecting fees for the Canadian Federation of Students (CFS) after students overwhelmingly rejected the organization in a referendum. Guelph’s Central Student Association (CSA) originally stood up for the result of the referendum in court, but recently decided to settle with the CFS and pay the fees. However, students were not consulted on the matter at any point, deliberations were made in secret, and a deliberate decision was taken to ignore the democratic voice of students. A few months ago, the University, concerned with the lack of consultation, conducted another survey on whether students wanted to continue paying CFS fees (again, it was overwhelmingly rejected). The CSA responded with a press release that noted the University’s position:

[…] Means that the CSA is not empowered to make a decision in our own affairs without the approval of the University administration.

This is the same flawed argument: it is not student unions who should possess this power, but it is one that should ultimately lie with the students! What a radical concept. When a student union clearly acts against the wishes of its membership, the only recourse students have is their university administration. Individual students cannot really access the courts due to issues of cost and time.

Continue reading

Advertisements
Standard
The Ontarion

Why you should opt out of OPIRG

How would you feel if you were forced to pay money to a political party on campus every semester? Would you want to pay to support Stephen Harper, Dalton McGuinty, or Thomas Mulcair’s campaign? If you disagree with them, should you be forced to pay them? Of course not.

It is a fantastic exercise to donate to a political party or charity if you support it. It gives you a positive feeling when you contribute to something you love and believe in. However, when you are forced to pay for an ideology you disagree with, it leaves you feeling angry and helpless.

There is an organization on campus called the Ontario Public Interest Research Group (OPIRG), which participates in a number of initiatives that can only be characterized as radical and at odds with the views of the vast majority of students. I don’t mind that this group exists on campus; diversity is a crucial thing to have. What does worry me is that every student pays a sum of money – for what many amounts to a hidden tax – every semester to prop up this organization when so few students benefit or even know it exists.

Continue reading

Standard
The Prince Arthur Herald

The role of student unions should be re-examined

Student unions are such a common part of our university careers that we tend to take them for granted. Student government often exists at all levels of the institution, ranging from the department, to the college or school, all the way to the collective student union. The student union levies fees on students and provides certain services in return. The representatives of the union are often directly elected by students (with usually abysmal voter turnout).

Unfortunately, student unions commonly engage in overtly political activity. Students should actively monitor their unions and speak out when they are engaging in questionable activity.  For example, Ontario’s radical student federation, the Canadian Federation of Students (Ontario) (CFS-O), was actively involved in planning the Quebec-Ontario Student Solidarity Tour. The phone number provided for the event linked directly to a CFS-O executive. The event was endorsed by a number of student unions, including those at Guelph, Queen’s, Windsor, and Ottawa. But it certainly was not by the people! At Guelph, students received no word of this decision until after the fact, and no attempt was made to consult the student body at large. The event involved student protest leaders with questionable politics. Guelph student union executives made a plea for students to join the strike movement, and even to donate money to student leaders fighting a legal challenge in Quebec.

Continue reading

Standard